10 Most Common Health Conditions That Require to Visit a Dietician?

10 Most Common Health Conditions That Require to Visit a Dietician?
 - Kolkata

Nutritionist/Dietitian

Kolkata   |   16 May 2023

Have you ever had trouble eating because of an illness? Let's say, "Yeah, I was sick, and I couldn't get enough nutrition into my body." Then after a while, you're feeling better, and suddenly, you have lost all that weight without changing anything. It can happen because your appetite is affected when you are suffering from an illness. Dieticians are often called on to provide services for patients with medical conditions leading to poor nutrition. It helps you develop healthy eating habits or prescribe medication to improve your appetite and weight gain.

20% of deaths worldwide occur due to nutrition-deficiency diseases, and more than 678,000 lives in the US alone yearly. Pediatrics and Teenage Nutrition are the most required and renowned science to correct lifestyle disorders in children and teenagers and avoid lateral health complications. Although it may seem that nutrition-deficiency disorders are mainly confined to elderly individuals and people with chronic diseases such as obesity, a wide range of other conditions can affect babies and children, including anemia. Therefore, pregnant women should eat enough iron-rich foods such as lean meats, fish, chicken, or red meat. Eating foods enriched with iron during pregnancy helps prevent anemia in their child; however, pregnant women also must pay close attention not to consume too much iron as this can lead to iron overload.

Going On A Diet? Here Are The Most Common Health-related Conditions A Dietician Can Help You with. Scroll down to know the health problems dieticians can help with the 9 Most Common Conditions.

Table of content

  • Who is a dietician?
  • What do dietitians do? What is their role?
  • What Causes Poor Nutrition?
  • Risk Factors
  • What is a healthy diet?
  • When to consult a dietician? How do they treat it?
  • Key Takeaways
  • Conclusion

Who is a Dietician?

Dietitians are qualified health professionals that diagnose, assess, and treat nutritional and dietary problems at an individual and more comprehensive public health level. They use the most up-to-date scientific research on health, food, and disease, translating reality and guiding people to make appropriate food choices and lifestyle changes.

What do dietitians do? What is their role?

The primary role of the Health and care professions council (HCPC) is to protect the public. It keeps a register of health professionals who stand up to its standards and takes action against registered health professionals who fall below those standards. In addition, registered professionals must stay up-to-date through compulsory Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

The minimum educational requirement to be a dietician is "BSc Hons in Dietetics" with a postgraduate "degree in Dietetics." They are the only licensed nutrition professionals and work to the highest standards.

What Causes Poor Nutrition?

Poor eating habits, such as overeating or under-eating various types of food and carbonated drinks, which are high in fat, salt, and sugar and low in fiber, can lead to metabolic disorders. As a result, we need more of the healthy foods we need each day. In addition, these unhealthy eating habits can affect our nutrient intake, including energy protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, essential fatty acids, minerals, fiber, and fluid.

Many things can affect our appetite, taste, or nutrient absorption. Get tips on coping with illness or health issues to maintain your health and improve your quality of life from the dietitian near me.

Risk Factors

 There are two types of risk factors

  • Non-modifiable
  • Metabolic

Non-modifiable risk factors: 

The risk factors that cannot be modified or controlled by the intervention are called non-modifiable risk factors.

  • Age
  • Genetics
  • Gender
  • Race

Metabolic risk factors:

The metabolic risk factors that lead to four significant changes in the metabolic system increase the possibility of NCDs:

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Obesity
  • High blood glucose levels or hyperglycemia
  • High levels of fat in the blood or hyperlipidemia

Increased blood pressure is the leading metabolic risk factor globally, with 19% of global deaths attributed to it, followed by obesity and hyperglycemia. Follow these helpful tips to get back on track to healthy eating and improve your overall health. 

What is a healthy diet?

WHO standard, healthy diets are rich in fiber, beans, vegetables, fruit, lentils, nuts, and whole grains. These diets are balanced and meet a person's micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) and macronutrients (fiber, carbohydrate, protein, and fat) based on their stages of life.

A healthy diet contains:

  • Fat intake needs to be less than 30% of total energy. These should be mainly unsaturated fats, less saturated fat, and avoid Trans fat.
  • Intake of sugar must be less than 10.5% of total energy, mostly less than 5%.
  • Intake of salt must be less than 5g per day.
  • Fruit and vegetable intake of at least 500g per day.

When to consult a dietician? How do they treat it?

The risk of developing chronic diseases is fetal, especially during old age. Thus, adult chronic diseases reflect the combined effects of prior exposure to damaging environments. Therefore, preventive measures are to be followed at all life stages. If you are experiencing and below symptoms, you can consult a top dietician to treat your condition.

  • Anemia: Loss of conversion of blood due to the destruction of b12 from food intake. The dietician advises you to have a proper schedule and diet intake to reduce devastation.
  • Cancer: Unhealthy food habits can lead to metabolic detoxing resulting in gastric and colon cancers. Dietitians help you understand and follow positive diet changes required for a healthy lifestyle. Hence, they motivate you to establish healthy habits to prevent cancer.

Major Modifiable Risk Factors

Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

Other Risk Factors

  • High blood pressure Abnormal lipids profile Tobacco
  • Physical inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Unhealthy diet (salt) Diabetes
  • Heavy alcohol
  • Age
  • Heredity
  • Family history
  • Gender
  • Ethnicity
  • Race
  • Excess homocysteine in the blood
  • Inflammatory markers C Reactive protein
  • Abnormal blood coagulation
  • (elevated blood levels of fibrinogen)
  • Lipoprotein(a)
  • Cardiovascular diseases: Over accumulation of cholesterol in the blood vessels leads to heart stroke. Dietitians focus on long-term, realistic goal setting to help you achieve your healthy lifestyle and keep your cholesterol levels in check. Do not expect a quick fix – expect a safer fix.

Major Modifiable Risk Factors

Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

Other Risk Factors

  • High blood pressure Abnormal lipids profile Tobacco
  • Physical inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Unhealthy diet (salt) Diabetes
  • Heavy alcohol
  • Age
  • Heredity
  • Family history
  • Gender
  • Ethnicity
  • Race
  • Excess homocysteine in the blood
  • Inflammatory markers C Reactive protein
  • Abnormal blood coagulation
  • (elevated blood levels of fibrinogen)
  • Lipoprotein(a)

Chronic Fatigue:

  • As we get older, our taste buds change.
  • We may need more assistance with meal preparation/eating.
  • Our habits around food may alter.
  • Dietitians can discuss suitable dietary strategies for those with dementia and those who require special diets for their health in older age.

Diabetes and Glycaemic Index: Dietitians can help you to safely adopt a heart-healthy diet that suits you, your tastes, and your lifestyle. They are a vital member of your healthcare team in managing heart disease and stroke risk factors.

Major Modifiable Risk Factors

Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

Other Risk Factors

  • High blood pressure Abnormal lipids profile Tobacco
  • Physical inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Unhealthy diet (salt) Diabetes
  • Heavy alcohol
  • Age
  • Heredity
  • Family history
  • Gender
  • Ethnicity
  • Race
  • Excess homocysteine in the blood
  • Inflammatory markers C Reactive protein
  • Abnormal blood coagulation
  • (elevated blood levels of fibrinogen)
  • Lipoprotein(a)
  • Fatty Liver: Accumulating excess fat in the liver due to intake of unsaturated fats can lead to liver disease, says "Women's Health Obesity renal disease."
  • Food Allergies & Intolerance: In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), blood glucose levels are between normal and diabetic.
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders: Bloating, constipation, and flatulence – are caused due to digestion disorder. Your dietitian will advise a diet that quickly helps improve your digestive health. Check out the Gut Health blog for tips on managing nutrition for your digestive health.
  • Healthy Eating: Eating healthily and happily through learning to read food labels, optimize your cooking techniques, prepare your daily menus, and many more essential skills.
  • Osteoporosis: Rheumatology is the department of science that deals with the study of degenerative diseases like osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Osteoporosis is another form of a degenerative disease causing brittle bones. Eating a healthy vegetarian or vegan diet suggested by the dietician will help you manage osteoporosis.  

Key Takeaways

  • The doctor may suggest you see a dietitian based on your health condition.
  • The dietitian will work closely with you to select a suitable diet.
  • Dietitians advise on food and nutrition to help people improve their health and well-being.
  • When choosing a dietitian, make sure they are an Accredited Practicing Dietitian (APD).
  • Unhealthy diets and malnutrition are significant drivers of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) worldwide.
  • Malnutrition includes obesity or overweight, undernutrition, and other diet-related NCDs like cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stroke, and some cancers.

Conclusion:

I hope you learned a few things you can apply to your health and wellness by reading this article. However, it is essential to be aware of potential problems to prevent them. It is also important to have a positive mindset. If you are happy and healthy today, then this is what matters. Be aware of the problems that you might come across and make the necessary changes to ensure the best future for yourself.

Even children and adolescent patients a dietician did not see over the last year had at least one visit from a primary medical physician. There is an urgent need for advice from dieticians concerning young people. Please share this article to help others struggling with their appetite.

Was this article helpful?

Yes (9) No
Report an error
Comments